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One Faith, One Call, One Mission

Groundbreaking-Cancer-Center

Mercy and St. Anthony's leaders break ground on the new Cancer Center.

Leaders and co-workers at St. Anthony's/Mercy Hospital South joined with Mercy Monday morning for a celebration of their shared legacy and to break ground for the Mercy Hospital South Cancer Center.
 
The ceremonies also included a reveal of the new Heritage Wall in the hospital lobby, which documents the rich heritage and shared mission of the founders of St. Anthony's and Mercy.
 
Read more about the ceremonies and view photos from the event below.
Leaders and co-workers of St. Anthony’s Medical Center, to be called Mercy Hospital South starting Oct. 1, celebrated the groundbreaking of a new cancer center in ceremonies on Monday. The center will be named in honor of David M. Sindelar.
 
Mr. Sindelar was born and raised in south St. Louis County. As a youth, he would ride his bicycle around the site that would later become St. Anthony’s Medical Center. In the decades following his graduations from Lindbergh High School and Saint Louis University, he ran several successful businesses. He officially became part of St. Anthony’s leadership team when he joined its board of directors in 2002. He was elected board chairman in 2010 and was named CEO in 2015. Mr. Sindelar recognized a partnership with Mercy and its shared mission, values and cultures was the right path for St. Anthony’s to extend and improve its commitment to south St. Louis County. Under his leadership, St. Anthony’s and Mercy announced in February 2017 that an affiliation agreement had been reached. Mr. Sindelar passed away the following month from cancer at the age of 59.
 
“Naming our new cancer center for Dave is more than just a way to honor him and his leadership,” said Win Reed, St. Anthony’s (Mercy Hospital South) chairman of the board. “It also reflects our commitment to care for our community because no one cared more for south county than Dave did.”
 
The David M. Sindelar Cancer Center will be a stand-alone comprehensive cancer care facility on the Mercy Hospital South campus. It will provide patients one location for diagnosis and treatment of all cancers, including enhanced technological capabilities along with access to oncology and surgical specialists. The facility also will include a new breast center. A connector will provide patients, visitors and co-workers access from the two-story, 70,000-square-foot center to the hospital. Construction of the center is expected to be completed in early 2020.
 
“Our partnership with Mercy is about providing the care our community needs and deserves,” said Sean Hogan, president of St. Anthony’s (Mercy Hospital South). “One of the requests we heard from our community was to fill the need for improved, comprehensive cancer care. We are thrilled to be able to answer that call with this facility.”
 
During the ceremonies, leaders also celebrated a shared legacy of ministry dating to the 19th century, from the opening of the first House of Mercy, to the Franciscan Sisters’ opening of St. Anthony’s, to St. Anthony’s transition to Mercy Hospital South. It is a legacy of “One Faith. One Call. One Mission.”
 
That legacy now is on display with the unveiling of a heritage wall in the lobby of St. Anthony’s Medical Center, to be called Mercy Hospital South starting Oct. 1. The wall traces the history of service of the Franciscan Sisters of Germany, who arrived in St. Louis and opened their first hospital in 1873, and the Sisters of Mercy.
 
“As we’ve worked to transition to Mercy, I have been privileged to learn more about the Franciscan Sisters and their commitment to St. Louis,” said Tom Edelstein, St. Anthony’s (Mercy Hospital South) vice president of Mission. “It is remarkable how the commitment to service of the Franciscan Sisters mirrors that of the Sisters of Mercy. It is an honor for us to continue the work of both orders.”
 
Mercy’s commitment to serve began with one woman, founder Catherine McAuley. She opened the first House of Mercy in Dublin, Ireland on Sept. 24, 1827 to serve the poor, sick and uneducated. Today, 191 years later, Catherine’s legacy of caring and compassion continues at the first House of Mercy, within Mercy’s hospitals and clinics, and within our communities where the need remains great.